Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Tip Tuesday - Do Your Paintings Look Chalky?

"Garden Path" Oil on 8" x 6" panel

Call it what you like - titanium, flake, zinc, radiant - it's a paint tube that every artist shudders at the thought of painting without. It's addictive, need to lighten a color? Add white. Not light enough? Add just a bit more. Still not quite capturing that light? Well, you get the idea.

White can be so addictive in fact that some paintings look like a dirty chalkboard eraser was used on top of them. Sadly, all that bright, vibrant and expensive (paint doesn't grow on trees) color is lost and the painting looses it's impact.

How do you correct this problem? I hope you like turkey because you're going to need a cold dose of it.

Paint without white. There, I said it. Go grab yourself a glass of wine and continue reading when you have fortified yourself.

Obviously, you can't give up painting without white forever but try it for a while and see how far you can get using other colors to lighten your paint mixtures. You'll be surprised at how far various yellows will take you. The bonus is you will also discover color mixtures you never would have tried if you had white on your palette.

Have I done this? Yes, I painted without white for 3 months and I make my students paint without it at least once a year.

The piece above was created entirely without white, my students can vouch for me because it was a class demonstration painting.

Paint on my friends (without white - at least for this week)!

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Does Drawing Matter in a Loose Painting?

"The Channel" Oil on 16" x 20" panel

When teaching I've been asked if a painter can hide the fact that they can't draw if they paint really loosely. Immediately an image of a magician doing a card trick pops into my head as I imagine how a painter might employ that same type of visual slight of hand.

The student asking the question is usually disappointed with my answer and they then proceed to try to prove me wrong my slapping as much paint as possible onto their canvas.

Detail 1

What do I tell my class when this question comes up? No, you can't hide a weak drawing by painting loosely.

The structural framework of a piece is absolutely critical even in a painterly painting. The best artists are the ones who know which edges they can obliterate and which edges are important to keep intact so that the form is readable to the viewer. Nicolai Fechin was a master at painting both loosely and accurately.

Detail 2

So, if you're an artist, draw. All of us need to draw more (myself included).

While I'm not the most painterly painter around I've been pushing into that territory a bit more with my Los Angeles River Bridge series. The painting above was inspired by the small plein air painting below.

"L.A. River Bridge" Oil on 9" x 12" panel